Topic: Katikati in 1886 by Ellen McCormack

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Katikati events in 1886. Compiled by Katikati Historian Ellen McCormack (2017).

5 January 1886 B.O.P. Times.

Harvesting operations have already commenced, Mount Stewart taking the lead. The prolonged drought has been sadly detrimental to the crops. Canon Johnston cut his oats on Saturday, to be followed by Mr. Surtees, Messrs Tanner and Hoeing during the week.

 

13 February 1886 B.O.P. Times

It is now some ten years since this special settlement, was formed by George Vesey Stewart Esq. and I think very few if any settlements in New Zealand has made as much progress in such a short time; from where I write I can view our one hundred homesteads, we have a church which would be an ornament in any settlement, three public schools, a most commodious public Hall, a cheese factory which manufactures cheese, second to none in the colony, a Post Office, and Telegraph Station, presided over by the most urbane of officials, a Court House, Police Station, and a lock up, [seldom if ever used, indeed no court has been held here for years] two excellent Public stores, where you can absolutely procure everything from a needle to an anchor, two Butchers shops, with every prospect of a third, at an early date , a Baker, a Blacksmith, a Saddler, three Builders a Bricklayer, and two most respectable and comfortable Hotels.   

The township is situated on the River Uretara, on which there are four wharves viz. Martray, Castle Grace, the Pioneer and the Victoria, at all of which the steamer calls when required, in the matter of regular traders we have the S.L. Result. The yawls General Gordon and Muriel, cutters Victoria, Oi, and the Bismark, and a Mail coach which runs through the settlement  four days a week.

We had a resident medico, but he cleared out several years ago, his own words being that it was “ and abominably healthy place” in which I quite concur, indeed I consider Katikati, the

healthiest  place in the known world, true we have a Cemetery, in which only repose the remains of an aged gentleman [Katikati’s first clergyman] and two infants; whilst it is said, we have both gold, and silver in the ranges, I know we have any amount of fish in our harbour.

We have residents English, Scotch, Irish, Germans, and though last not least Dane’s, for does not the Dannebrog “ float on King Christian’s Birthday from the Tower at Castle Grace”

 

17 February 1886 B.O.P. Times.

Some of the Katikati farms have done very well this summer both green feed and crops being satisfactory, one farm of 200 acres has been carrying a beast to an acre for some time past.

 

15 April 1886 B.O.P. Times

The Potato Crop-- has not turned out a good one, owing to the lengthened drought, still Mr. Noble Johnston as in former years is to the front, with a splendid crop, which he is shipping to Tauranga and Auckland.

His farm is well suited for the growing of this tuber.

 

10 June 1886 My Simple Life.

Volcanic Eruption and Earthquakes.

During the next week endless mobs of cattle were driven through the settlement to anywhere, for feed for the starving animals.

 

3 July 1886 B.O.P. Times.

Volcanic Dust.---The farmers here, consider the grass will be greatly benefited by the shower of volcanic dust, which goes to prove the truth of the old adage ‘It is an evil wind that blows no one any good’ we regret to see from your column that our old friend Fisher has come to grief amidst the mud, but are glad to hear ??  as not stuck in the mud,  and we will rejoice to see him in the flesh, even without his nether garments, which he has left in the volcanic mud,  and to hear his yarn on this dreadful disaster.

 

8 July 1886 B.O.P. Times.

We have just been furnished with another proof of the adaptability of the land at Katikati for the growth of fruit, by being shown two very fine lemons from the orchard of Mr. John Killen. The fruit is not only well shaped but has grown to a very large size, each lemon weighing 15ounces, and the tree from which it was taken, although only six years old, is a most prolific bearer.

 

5 August 1886 B.O.P.Times.

A Katikati correspondent writes-‘I have again to congratulate Mr. E. K. Gilbert, the enterprising butcher of Katikati in once more being to the forward.

On Monday the 2nd inst he killed the first lamb of the season. The weight of the animal was 36 lbs, a cross- bred raised by Mr. John Killen J.P. on his Glenville property. As the lamb was only  ?????   old this spells volumes as to the adaptability of Katikati land for the raising of sheep. 

 

10 August 1886 B.O.P. Times.

A large quantity of oaten hay it is anticipated, will this year be grown at Katikati.

Already several large paddocks have been sown and many more are being prepare, the high price of oaten hat this year may have had the effect of inducing settlers to produce in larger quantities an article in such demand.

 

28 August 1886 B.O.P. Times.

The s.s.Waitoa –This steamer took the ground on her trip from Tauranga on Monday last, a little above the wharf at “Castle Grace.” I thought the County Council, at their last meeting, had agreed to stake the channel. A few stakes here and there will be of no use, in fact if when done t’were well done, then better it be done quickly, but if when done, it were not well done, then better it be left undone.

 

31 August 1886 B.O.P. Times.

The ketch General Gordon arrived in Tauranga yesterday with a full cargo of Katikati manufactured bricks.

 

13 September 1886.

Captain Mervyn Stewart husband of Frances Stewart [nee Vesey.] died at his home ‘Martray’ Kauri Point, Katikati. Aged 92 years. buried Katikati Cemetery. [Father of George Vesey and  Hugh Stewart and Mary Gledstanes.]

 

2 November 1886 B.O.P. Times.

There are several hot springs in Katikati notably one near Mr. Killen’s property, and one on Mr. Tanner’s land which adjourns the property formerly owned by Mr. Claude Park.

 

23 December 1886 B.O.P. Times.

Mr. George Crosby advertises that he will, should sufficient inducement offer, run a coach to Katikati on Monday next, Boxing Day, returning to Tauranga the same evening, fares ten shillings.

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Katikati in 1886 by Ellen McCormack


Year:1886
City:Katikati, New Zealand5/1/ 1886. B.O.P. Times. Harvesting operations have already commenced, Mount Stewart taking the lead. The prolonged drought has been sadly detrimental to the crops. Canon Johnston cut his oats on Saturday, to be followed by Mr. Surtees, Messrs Tanner and Hoeing during the week. 13 /2 / 1886. B.O.P.Times It is now some ten years since this special settlement, was formed by George Vesey Stewart Esq. and I think very few if any settlements in New Zealand has made as much progress in such a short time; from where I write I can view our one hundred homesteads, we have a church which would be an ornament in any settlement, three public schools, a most commodious public Hall, a cheese factory which manufactures cheese, second to none in the colony, a Post Office, and Telegraph Station, presided over by the most urbane of officials, a Court House, Police Station, and a lock up, [seldom if ever used, indeed no court has been held here for years] two excellent Public stores, where you can absolutely procure everything from a needle to an anchor, two Butchers shops, with every prospect of a third, at an early date , a Baker, a Blacksmith, a Saddler, three Builders a Bricklayer, and two most respectable and comfortable Hotels. The township is situated on the River Uretara, on which there are four wharves viz. Martray, Castle Grace, the Pioneer and the Victoria, at all of which the steamer calls when required, in the matter of regular traders we have the S.L. Result. The yawls General Gordon and Muriel, cutters Victoria, Oi, and the Bismark, and a Mail coach which runs through the settlement four days a week. We had a resident medico, but he cleared out several years ago, his own words being that it was “ and abominably healthy place” in which I quite concur, indeed I consider Katikati, the healthiest place in the known world, true we have a Cemetery, in which only repose the remains of an aged gentleman [Katikati’s first clergyman] and two infants; whilst it is said, we have both gold, and silver in the ranges, I know we have any amount of fish in our harbour. We have residents English, Scotch, Irish, Germans, and though last not least Dane’s, for does not the Dannebrog “ float on King Christian’s Birthday from the Tower at Castle Grace” 17/ 2/ 1886. B.O.P.Times. Some of the Katikati farms have done very well this summer both green feed and crops being satisfactory, one farm of 200 acres has been carrying a beast to an acre for some time past. 15 / 4 / 1886. B.O.P.Times The Potato Crop-- has not turned out a good one, owing to the lengthened drought, still Mr. Noble Johnston as in former years is to the front, with a splendid crop, which he is shipping to Tauranga and Auckland. His farm is well suited for the growing of this tuber. 10 / 6/1886. My Simple Life. Volcanic Eruption and Earthquakes. During the next week endless mobs of cattle were driven through the settlement to anywhere, for feed for the starving animals. 3 / 7 / 1886. B.O.P.Times.[ needs checking.]>>>>>>>> Volcanic Dust.---The farmers here, consider the grass will be greatly benefited by the shower of volcanic dust, which goes to prove the truth of the old adage ‘It is an evil wind that blows no one any good’ we regret to see from your column that our old friend Fisher has come to grief amidst the mud, but are glad to hear ?? as not stuck in the mud, and we will rejoice to see him in the flesh, even without his nether garments, which he has left in the volcanic mud, and to hear his yarn on this dreadful disaster. 8 / 7 /1886.B.O.P.Times. We have just been furnished with another proof of the adaptability of the land at Katikati for the growth of fruit, by being shown two very fine lemons from the orchard of Mr. John Killen. The fruit is not only well shaped but has grown to a very large size, each lemon weighing 15ounces, and the tree from which it was taken, although only six years old, is a most prolific bearer. 5 / 8/1886. B.O.P.Times. A Katikati correspondent writes-‘I have again to congratulate Mr. E. K. Gilbert, the enterprising butcher of Katikati in once more being to the forward. On Monday the 2nd inst he killed the first lamb of the season. The weight of the animal was 36 lbs, a cross- bred raised by Mr. John Killen J.P. on his Glenville property. As the lamb was only ????? old this spells volumes as to the adaptability of Katikati land for the raising of sheep. 10/ 8 /1886. B.O.P.Times. A large quantity of oaten hay it is anticipated, will this year be grown at Katikati. Already several large paddocks have been sown and many more are being prepare, the high price of oaten hat this year may have had the effect of inducing settlers to produce in larger quantities an article in such demand. 28/8/1886.B.O.P.Times. The s.s.Waitoa –This steamer took the ground on her trip from Tauranga on Monday last, a little above the wharf at “Castle Grace.” I thought the County Council, at their last meeting, had agreed to stake the channel. A few stakes here and there will be of no use, in fact if when done t’were well done, then better it be done quickly, but if when done, it were not well done, then better it be left undone. 31/8/1886.B.O.P.Times. The ketch General Gordon arrived in Tauranga yesterday with a full cargo of Katikati manufactured bricks. 13 / 9/1886. Captain Mervyn Stewart husband of Frances Stewart [nee Vesey.] died at his home ‘Martray’ Kauri Point. Katikati. Aged 92 years. buried Katikati Cemetery. [Father of George Vesey and Hugh Stewart and Mary Gledstanes.] 2/11/1886. B.O.P.Times. There are several hot springs in Katikati notably one near Mr. Killen’s property, and one on Mr. Tanner’s land which adjourns the property formerly owned by Mr. Claude Park. 23/12/1886.B.O.P.Times. Mr. George Crosby advertises that he will, should sufficient inducement offer, run a coach to Katikati on Monday next, Boxing Day, returning to Tauranga the same evening, fares ten shillings.