Topic: Battle of Gate Pā: Māori

Topic type:

It is thought that 230 Māori took part in the Battle of Gate Pā on 29 April 1864. This page is an attempt to list those Māori who were killed, wounded and who fought in the battle.

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'The very fact that Pukehinahina was defended by a mere 200 men should caution us against any assumption that all Tauranga Maori – or even all Ngai Te Rangi – fought against the British at Pukehinahina. Though there is a tendency for all to share in retrospective glory, and to claim that some ancestors were there, it is clear that many hapu, particularly from the east, south, and west of the district, were not represented at the pa at all. Even hapu were divided: some Ngai Tukairangi were at Pukehinahina, while others acted as guides for the Crown forces (a matter that still causes some embarrassment today, as we found). Although Pirirakau were definitely represented in the defence of one wing of the pa, other Ngati Ranginui hapu do not appear to have been significantly represented. However, the battle did take place on Ngai Tamarawaho land, and their counsel named six men from the hapu who took part. She also reminded us that a kin group that still exists, Ngati Matepu, got its name from those who died from the guns at Pukehinahina' (Waitangi Tribunal Report: Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana: Report on the Tauranga Confiscation Claims, 2004, p. 107).

Iwi represented at Gate Pā:

  • Ngāi Tamarāwhao (Huria Marae, Tauranga).
  • Ngāi Te Rangi (Tauranga).
  • Ngāi Tukairangi (Matapihi, Tauranga).
  • Ngati Koheriki (Wairoa, Tauranga).
  • Ngati Ranginui (Tauranga) - small oblong redoubt.
  • Okoheriki (Rotorua) - small oblong redoubt.
  • Pirirākau (Te Puna, Tauranga) - small oblong redoubt.

Killed or died later from wounds:

  1. HARAWIRA, Te (?-1864). Ngati Rangiwewehi (Rotorua). Killed at Gate Pā. (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 64).
  2. KAHOPORA, Te (?-1864). Poike. Later died from wounds (Nicholas, 1999, p. 38).
  3. KAU, Te [Te Kou] (?-1864). Chief of Tuhua Te Urungawera (Mayor Island). Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5), (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63). 'Te Kou was bayoneted to death and many others received bayonet wounds' (Star, 31 October 1903, p. 2).
  4. KIRIPARARA, Te (?-1864). Te Piriakau (Te Wairoa). Killed at Gate Pā (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63).
  5. KIRITANA, Arama Karaka (?-1864). Ngati Maru. Killed at Gate Pā. (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 64).
  6. Ihakara Koikoi [Ihaka/Isaac] (?-1864). The first person killed. (Ngātai, 1903, para. 12 & 24).
  7. KOHAMO (?-1864). Te Urungawera hapu. Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5).
  8. MANOTINI, Te Raweti [Te Reweti Manatini - Reweti Mauotrini - Davis - Reweti Manotini - Rawiri] (?-1864). Te Matewaitai. Married Ngakumama of Ngaiteahi. Second in command at Gate Pā. Received six or seven gunshot wounds from Dr Manley and had his legs broken. Appears in a Robley painting. Died 8 May 1864. (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 62 & 64). 'Te Reweti Manatini (taken next day to Te Papa, where he died)' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24). Reweti Mauotrini (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5). 'My parent, Rawiri, fell with seven gunshot wounds' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 18). 'Raweti' (Prickett, 2004, p. 45). 'One of the wounded was the notorious Reweti Manotini (Davis) of Tauranga, private secretary and agent for Wm Thompson in the Bay of Plenty' (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5).
  9. MONUHOUHOU, Te [Te Monhouho/Te Mouhouho] (?-1864). Ngaiti Raukawa chief of Patetere and the Wairoa. Killed at Gate Pā. 'Te Mouhouho' (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5). ‘A principal chief of Nagtiraukawa’ [Te Monhouho] (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63).
  10. MOTUPUKA, Te (?-1864). Ngati Tawhaki (Poiki, Waikato). Killed at Gate Pā (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63).
  11. PARAWAI [Piawa] (?-1864). Ngatiteniha hapu. Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5), (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24).'Paiawa' Ngati Te Ahi (Waimapu) (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63).
  12. PETARIKA, Te Kanae (?-1864). Te Matewaitai (Otumoetai). Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5). 'Petariki'  (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63), (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24).
  13. PIUHARANGI (?-1864). Ngaterangi. Killed at Gate Pā. Mr Rice 'came upon the remains of a chief named Piuharangi; the body was found some considerable distance from the gate. It was so offensive that a hole was dug and the body placed in it' (New Zealander, 31 May 1864, p. 5, column 3). 'Only twenty of the enemy dead were found in the Pa, but nine more were collected, making twenty-nine who were buried on the west side of Cameron Road, between it and the swamp in the grove of trees there. A fortnight afterwards Piwharangi, another Ngaiterangi, was found and placed with the others, making thirty in all' (Mair, 1926, p. 17)
  14. PUHIRAKE, Eruera [Eru Puhirake - Arue] (?-1864). Nephew of Rawiri Puhirake. Ohuki.  Died from injuries on 7 May 1864 (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 64). 'Eru Puhirake' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24). 'Arue, nephew of Rawiri their fighting general, is wounded’ (Taranaki Herald, 1864, p. 3).
  15. PUHIRAKE, Te Kani  (?-1864). Matekiwaho hapu (Te Apitiu, Rangataua Bay). Brother of Rawiri Puhiraki. Killed at Gate Pā whilst breaking out of the east side (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63), (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5). 'The chiefs, Te Kani and Keni and a number of men were killed, and several badly wounded, including Te Ipu and Wiari' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 16 & 24).
  16. RAHOPORA (?-1864) Ngatiteniha hapu (Poiki). Killed at Gate Pā (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 64), (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5).
  17. RANGITAU, Te [Te Rangihau] (?-1864). Killed at Gate Pā (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24). 'Te Rangihau' (Prickett, 2004, p. 45).
  18. RAUHUHU, Te (?-1864). Killed at Gate Pā (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24).
  19. REKA (?-1864). Killed at Gate Pā (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24).
  20. ROTOHIKO (?-1864). Te Urangawera hapu (Tuhua, Mayor Island). Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5), (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63).
  21. TAMATEA (?-1864). Killed at Gate Pā (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24).
  22. TAPATOPA [Topatopa] (?-1864). Ngai Tamarawaho (Huria). Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5). 'Topatopa' (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 64).
  23. TARA, Ta 'From the inquiries of the wounded prisoners as to whether the bodies of Ta Tara and other chiefs have been found, it is presumed that the bodies of all their dead men of note have been removed' (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864).
  24. TARATIKITIKI, Eruera (?-1864). Matekiwaho hapu. Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864).
  25. TARATOA, Ihau Hoani (?-1864). Te Ngare (Opounui, Rangiwaea Island). Brother of Henare Taratoa. Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5), (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63).
  26. TIKIKU [Tikuhu] (?-1864). Ngati Ruahine (Poiki). Native teacher at Poiki. Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5), (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63). 'Tikuhu' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24).
  27. TIMOTI (?-1864). Ngaitamawhariua (Matakana). Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5), (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 64). 'Our leaders, Rawiri, Tuaia, Hakaraia, Mahika, Timoti and Poihipi showed valiant front, directing our affairs with cool courage. They ordered us not to utter a word or fire a shot till the proper time came for the order' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 15).
  28. TUHI, Te (?-1864). Ngai Tamarawaho (Huria). Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5), (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63).
  29. WAHAKORE, Tamihana (?-1864). Ngati Te Ahi (Waimapu). Killed at Gate Pā (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5). Poike - Ngati Te Ahi(Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 63).
  30. Te Wano (?-1864). Te Pirirākau (Te Wairoa). A tohunga killed at Gate Pā (Ngātai, 1903, para. 13 & 24).
  31. WHARANGI, Pi 'On Wednesday last Mr Rice, accompanied by a number of friendly natives, searched the swamp near the Gate Pa where the great fight took place. They found the body of Pi Wharangi, a third-rate chief. He had been wounded in the temple and the thigh, and was interred near the camp’ (Daily Southern Cross, 7 May 1864, p. 4).
  32. WHAREPOURI, Te (?-1864). Ngaitamawhariu (Otumoetai). Killed at Gate Pā whilst breaking out of the east side (Smith, GBPP, 1864), (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24).

Wounded:

  1. AMOMAKO, Hone. Ohuki. Wounded at Gate Pā (Taranaki Herald, 1864, p. 3), (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5), (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 64).
  2. ATEWERA (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5). ‘A native named Atewera, belonging to Timothy’s [Timotai] hapu, escaped with a wound through his thigh, another through his wrist, and a third through the thick of one arm. During the fight he was forced to tie his arm to his side, but it is now off’ (Taranaki Herald, 1864, p. 3).
  3. ERU, Whakatana. Severely wounded at Gate Pā (Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui, 2012, p. 15).
  4. Te Ipu Hikareia [Te Ipu] (?-1901). Chief wounded at Gate Pā - foot smashed. 'Another well known Native, an old age pensioner, Te Ipu has just passed away after a brief illness. Te Ipu was a fisherman of renown and few could excel him in knowledge of the finny tribe and when and how to catch them. He was also a frequent visitor to the town where his lameness through a bullet having passed through his knee at the Gate Pa fight, made him an easily recognisable figure' (Bay of Plenty Times, 26 July 1901, p.2). 'The chiefs, Te Kani and Keni and a number of men were killed, and several badly wounded, including Te Ipu and Wiari' (It has been said that Te Ipu gave the dying soldier water, but he was badly wounded (foot smashed) and quite incapacitated.)' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 20).
  5. KERETI, Te. Ngāti Hangarau leader. One of the signatories to the Potiriwhi Code of Conduct (28 March 1864). Was one of the 112 who surrended at Te Papa on 25 July 1864. Noted that he was 'Wounded; lost gun at Gate Pa' (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 88). Killed at Te Ranga (Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui, 2012, p. 15).
  6. KINI. Patutahora hapu (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5).
  7. KOU, Waiari Te. Injured at Gate Pa. Later married Enoka Te Whanake's sister (Mair, 1926, p. 26).
  8. MAKARAURI, Hone. Severely wounded (Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui, 2012, p. 15).
  9. MOANANUI, Te. Wounded at Gate Pa, received three gunshot wounds (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24).
  10. NIKORIMA, Taipaku. 'Of Ngāi Tamarāwaho was shot in the leg (Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui, 2012, p. 15).
  11. NOA, Eru. Wounded at Gate Pā (Taranaki Herald, 1864, p. 3), (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5).
  12. PŌMARE. ‘Another of these, Pomare, got away with a severe wound in the arm’ (Taranaki Herald, 1864, p. 3). 'Te Ninihi and Pomare got through and escaped to Wairoa' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 16). (Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui, 2012, p. 15).
  13. RENATA. (Ngaeterangi). Wounded at Gate Pā. 'We have had conversation with two natives wounded at the Gate Pa fight, Renata and Hone Taharangi, of the Ngaeterangi tribe, and both distinctly and emphatically deny that even one woman was present, or that any member of the Ngatirangiwewehi was near the Gate Pa during the engagement. Hone says that at the small pa there were a number of the Koheriki, a hapu of the Ngatipawa, under a chief named Wi Koka. The Ngatirangiwewehi were only at Te Ranga' (Bay of Plenty Times, 22 April 1898, p. 2).
  14. REREKAIPUKE. 'My younger relative Rerekaipuke took away a spy glass belonging to Captain Hamilton (mortally wounded in the fight), but on being himself wounded afterwards by the 68th he threw it away' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 23).
  15. TAHARANGI, Hone [Hone Tahurangi] (?-1913) Ngaeterangi. Taharangi was wounded at Gate Pā leading the the loss of his leg. He later married Henare Taratoa's widow,  Rahapa. 'We have had conversation with two natives wounded at the Gate Pa fight, Renata and Hone Taharangi, of the Ngaeterangi tribe, and both distinctly and emphatically deny that even one woman was present, or that any member of the Ngatirangiwewehi was near the Gate Pa during the engagement. Hone says that at the small pa there were a number of the Koheriki, a hapu of the Ngatipawa, under a chief named Wi Koka. The Ngatirangiwewehi were only at Te Ranga' (Bay of Plenty Times, 22 April 1898, p. 2). 'Hone Tahurangi, an aged chief, over 80 years of age, died at the Oponui settlement on Friday morning. A big tangi will be held and a large number of local natives have already proceeded to show their respect to the deceased's relatives. The deceased chief was engaged at the Gate Pa fight in 1864 when he was wounded and lost a leg' (Bay of Plenty Times, 30 May 1913. p. 4). 'The death occurred at Oponui last week of a very aged lady named Rahapa, the wife of the late chief Hone Taharangi, who died last year. The deceased lady’s first husband was Henare Taratoa, who drafted the conditions of war for the engagement at Gate Pa and Te Ranga. These conditions gave protection to European women and children and men not carrying arms or connected with the engagement and that they were faithfully carried out by the Ngaiterangi tribe is evidenced by the action of Rawiri at Gate Pa when Colonel Booth fell. Hone Taharangi was also in the same engagement and lost one of his legs. A very large tangi is being held' (Bay of Plenty Times, 20 Apr 1914, p. 4). (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24).
  16. WIERI. [Wiari] 'The chiefs, Te Kani and Keni and a number of men were killed, and several badly wounded, including Te Ipu and Wiari' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 16). 'Wieri' (Prickett, 2004, p. 45).
  17. WHARETAIKI, Wi Heti [We Heti] (?-1918). Injured at Gate Pa. 'We Heti was both bayoneted and shot but got away' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 24). TARINA An elderly native woman named Mihi Tarina, wife of Wi Hete (who fought with the Maoris at Gate Pa and was wounded in the fight), died at Ohuke near Matapihi on Wednesday night. The deceased was born in Gisborne and was of high rank. The usual tangi is now in progress and many relatives are expected to attend from Gisborne' (Bay of Plenty Times, 31 December 1909, p. 2). 'A native named Wi Heti Wharetaiki, chief of the Ngaiterangi tribe, passed away at Matapihi on Saturday evening last. The old Maori was one of the few remaining who was a participant in the battle of Gate Pa, he having fought on the side of his own people. On that occasion he was wounded in the hand by gunshot and in the leg by a bayonet thrust. It was very amusing to hear his tell of how he threw his leg up in the air to free himself from the bayonet. It is believed that deceased was about 90 years of age. For the last year or two he had been almost blind, but was invariably cheerful and took a great interest in the present war' (Bay of Plenty Times, 6 March 1918, p. 2) & (Mair, 1926, p. 28).

Fought:

  1. AMOPO, Timoti Te (Stafford, 1967, p. 390).
  2. ERUERA, Whakatana  (?-1919). 'WHAKATANA ERUERA At Hairini, Tauranga on May 17 1919, Whakatana Eruera, a chief of the Ngati Ranganui and Ngati Tapu tribes - deeply mourned by his people' (Bay of Plenty Times, 7 May 1919, p. 2). 'The death occurred at the Hairini pa this morning of Whakatana Eruera, a well known chief of the Ngati Ranginui and Ngati Tapu tribes. Deceased had resided here all his life, and was a large land holder at Hairini, Oropi and Rotorua. He was the leading rangatira of the Hairini district. The customary tangi is in progress, and will be attended by natives from Rotorua, Waikato and surrounding districts' (Bay of Plenty Times, 7 May 1919, p. 3). (Nicholas, 1999, p. 39 - Tauranga Minute Book 6 Te Puna Lot 154).
  3. HAHUNGA, Te (Nicholas, 1999, p. 39).
  4. HAKARAIA [Ihakara]. 'He is said to be one of the engineers of Gate Pa and, at all events, it is known that he is well skilled in Maori tactics' (Daily Southern Cross, 1 March 1867, p. 7). 'Our leaders, Rawiri, Tuaia, Hakaraia, Mahika, Timoti and Poihipi showed valiant front, directing our affairs with cool courage. They ordered us not to utter a word or fire a shot till the proper time came for the order' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 15).
  5. HAWA, Te. 'The chief, Te Hawa, stood up on the ruined parapet shouting defiance at them and calling on us to meet their attack with courage' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 14).
  6. HETA. 'Chief Heta and twenty-six men of the Pirirakau, Ranginui and Okoheriki tribes in the small oblong redoubt' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 7).
  7. IHAIAH. ‘Ihaiah and Tihi, of the same mob [Ngaitamawhariua], are missing’ (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5).
  8. KAPU, Te Ninihi Te [Te Ninihi] (?-1876). 'Te Ninihi and Pomare got through and escaped to Wairoa' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 16). 'Te Ninihi Te Kapu, chief of the Whanau-a-Tauwhao tribe died of consumption at Rangiwaea on the 31st ult. The deceased was in the prime of life and since the affair of the Gate Pa has been a loyal friend to the Europeans. At the time of the disturbance between the Arawas and Ngaitirangi tribes, on the occasion of the Duke of Edinburgh's visit to Tauranga in 1870, Te Ninihi received severe injuries from which he never totally recovered. He was, without exception, the largest landowner in the district, a large portion of the island of Motiti being his property' (Bay of Plenty Times, 5 January 1876, p. 3).
  9. KENI, Te (?-1864). Ngati Raukawa (Otumoetai) (Smith, GBPP, 1864, p. 64). 'The chiefs, Te Kani and Keni and a number of men were killed, and several badly wounded, including Te Ipu and Wiari' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 16 & 24).
  10. Te Rauhea Paraone Koikoi (1828-1874). Chief of Ngāi Tamarāwaho. Father of Ihakara Koikoi who was the first person killed during the Battle of Gate Pa at Pukehinahina. (Bay of Plenty Times, 14 September 1920, p. 2).
  11. KOKA, Wi  'We have had conversation with two natives wounded at the Gate Pa fight, Renata and Hone Taharangi, of the Ngaeterangi tribe, and both distinctly and emphatically deny that even one woman was present, or that any member of the Ngatirangiwewehi was near the Gate Pa during the engagement. Hone says that at the small pa there were a number of the Koheriki, a hapu of the Ngatipawa, under a chief named Wi Koka. The Ngatirangiwewehi were only at Te Ranga' (Bay of Plenty Times, 22 April 1898, p. 2).
  12. KOTUKU, Rota Te. Pirirakau ‘It turned out to be Rota te Kotuku, a native of Te Irihanga, and who has persistently refused to take the oath of allegiance. A few years ago Rota murdered a relative of his own. Being a baptised native, Archdeacon Brown went up to Te Irihanga about the matter, and the only punishment Rota received was a good scolding. His weapon was a rifle that had belonged to a sergeant of the 43rd Regiment, and which probably had been taken at the Gate Pa’ (Daily Southern Cross, 20 February 1867, p. 3).
  13. MAHIKA. Koheriki. 'Our leaders, Rawiri, Tuaia, Hakaraia, Mahika, Timoti and Poihipi showed valiant front, directing our affairs with cool courage. They ordered us not to utter a word or fire a shot till the proper time came for the order' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 15).
  14. MAKA. Pirirakau. 'Gun lost at Gate Pa' (AJHR, p.22).
  15. MAUNGAPOHATU, Wanakore (Nicholas, 1999, p. 39).
  16. NETANA. (Nicholas, 1999, p. 40).
  17. NGARIMU, Hira (?-1917). 'A well known native named Hira Ngarimu died at Maungatapu on Sunday last. The customary tangi is now being held and is being attended by a large number of natives from the surrounding districts and Te Puke. The deceased was the father of the well known Rangataua, footballers Taikato, Ngawhare, Neketai, Tame and Hemara. He took part in the Maori wars and was regarded as one of the finest exponents of Maori war dancing in this district' (Bay of Plenty Times, 2 May 1917, p. 2).
  18. NGĀTAI, Hōri (c1832-1912). Ngai Te Rangi chief.
  19. NIKO, Hare Honi [Ahone Niko]. Ngapuhi tribe (Bay of Islands). Taken prisoner (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5). 'The Queen’s ship “Falcon’ which left Tauranga on Thursday afternoon arrived in this port yesterday morning and brings with her the only Maori prisoner captured at the Gate pa encounter, and he was taken in a swamp by a soldier when endeavouring to escape, his name is Ahone Niko, and he makes another addition to the little community on board the Marion hulk’ (New Zealand Herald, 7 May 1864, p. 3). 'Arriving as a prisoner in Auckland, asserting that he had not been fighting and was wrongfully taken prisoner' (New Zealander, 7 May 1864, p.5, column 4).
  20. NIRAI. (Nicholas, 1999, p. 40).
  21. PANEPANE. 'Panepane, one of our old men, a tatooed veteran, had leaned his gun against the earthworks while he joined in the prayers. After the burst of the shell he went to pick up his gun and found some of the dead Minister's [Ihakara] intestines were wrapped round and round the barrels, and a grim joke even at the cannon's mouth did the old warrior utter:— “He hinu ano kai roto i te purepo a te pakeha,” (“See, the white man even load and fire delicacies at us through their big guns.”)' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 12).
  22. PIHA. Koheriki (Nicholas, 1999, p. 40).
  23. POIHIPI, Te. Wakatohea Chief (Ngātai, 1903, para. 3 & 8). 'Our leaders, Rawiri, Tuaia, Hakaraia, Mahika, Timoti and Poihipi showed valiant front, directing our affairs with cool courage. They ordered us not to utter a word or fire a shot till the proper time came for the order' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 15).
  24. PUHIMANUKA, Terea. Ngāti Hangarau leader (Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui, 2012, p. 15).
  25. PUHIRAKE, Rawiri Tuaia (c1814-1864). Ngai Te Rangi leader. Killed at Te Ranga. 'Our leaders, Rawiri, Tuaia, Hakaraia, Mahika, Timoti and Poihipi showed valiant front, directing our affairs with cool courage. They ordered us not to utter a word or fire a shot till the proper time came for the order' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 15).
  26. RAUKAWA, Te Mete  (c1836-1926). (Matheson, 2012, para. 1).
  27. RAUMATI. Pirirakau. ‘Raumati, a Piri-Rakau chief and a young veteran of the Waikato war and the Gate Pa, who was to now fall mortally wounded’ (Gibson, 1974, p. 191).
  28. RENATA.  'We have had conversation with two natives wounded at the Gate Pa fight, Renata and Hone Taharangi, of the Ngaeterangi tribe, and both distinctly and emphatically deny that even one woman was present, or that any member of the Ngatirangiwewehi was near the Gate Pa during the engagement. Hone says that at the small pa there were a number of the Koheriki, a hapu of the Ngatipawa, under a chief named Wi Koka. The Ngatirangiwewehi were only at Te Ranga' (Bay of Plenty Times, 22 April 1898, p. 2).
  29. RETIRETI. (Nicholas, 1999, p. 40).
  30. TAIPARI, John McLeod (c1846-1916). (Te Puke Times, 8 February 1916, p. 2).
  31. TAIWHAKAEA, Tokona [Purautau Maaka] (?-1918). Died in the 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Nicholas, 1999, p. 39, 223).
  32. TAMAKI. Whakatohea (Opotiki) tribe (Ngātai, 1903, para. 3).
  33. TANGITU, Rāwiri. Pirirākau chief with high command during the battle (Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui, 2012, p. 15).
  34. TARATOA, Henare Wiremu (c1830-1864). Ngai Te Rangi leader. His birth name was Pererika Taratoa and when he was baptised he took the name Henare Wiremu. Killed at Te Ranga.
  35. TE RIRINUI, Te Ngarue From Te Whanau a Te Tuwhakairiora. Fought at Gate Pa and remembered in song. His taiaha was called Hunaara and is still with descendants today. He married Meha Taipari of Ngati He. (Yolande Tipuna, personal correspondance, 2014).
  36. TIHI. ‘Ihaiah and Tihi, of the same mob [Ngaitamawhariua], are missing’ (Daily Southern Cross, 5 May 1864, p. 5).
  37. TUAIA, Pene Taka [Penetaka Tuia] (c1809-1889). Pa Engineer. 'TUIA The great warrior Penetuka Tuia died at his kainga, Te Puna, yesterday. This rangatira was the engineer and superintendant in the construction of the Gate Pa where so many of our gallant British soldiers fell. Penetuka learnt his engineering in the past wars in the Bay of Islands. The chief drew £20 a year pension from the NZ Government' (Bay of Plenty Times, 4 July 1889, p. 2). 'Our leaders, Rawiri, Tuaia, Hakaraia, Mahika, Timoti and Poihipi showed valiant front, directing our affairs with cool courage. They ordered us not to utter a word or fire a shot till the proper time came for the order' (Ngātai, 1903, para. 15).
  38. UTIKI. Pirirakau. 'Gun lost at Gate Pa' (AJHR, p. 22).
  39. WHAKATUROU. (Nicholas, 1999, p. 40).

It is said that Te Auetu, a young girl of Ngāi Tamarāwaho and Wairoa, rescued three wounded soldiers. Two she took on horseback to a field hospital.  The third, David Hall, she took home, nursed, and later married (Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui, 2012, p. 15).

 

Sources:

Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives (1864 Session I, E-06, p. 22) Return of arms surrendered by natives.

Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives (1864 Session I, E-02, p. 13-14) Tauranga expedition and military operations generally.

Attwell, Peter (personal communication, 28 March 2014). Research Servies, Alexander Turnbull Library.

Bay of Plenty Times (5 January 1876, p. 3).

Bay of Plenty Times (22 April 1898, p. 2).

Bay of Plenty Times (26 July 1901, p.2).

Bay of Plenty Times (31 December 1909, p. 2).

Bay of Plenty Times (30 May 1913. p. 4).

Bay of Plenty Times (20 Apr 1914, p. 4).

Bay of Plenty Times (6 March 1918, p. 2).

Bay of Plenty Times (7 May 1919, p. 2).

Bay of Plenty Times (7 May 1919, p. 3).

Bay of Plenty Times (14 September 1920, p. 2).

Daily Southern Cross (5 May 1864, p. 5).

Daily Southern Cross (31 May 1864, p. 6).

Daily Southern Cross (7 May 1864, p. 4).

Gibson, Tom (1974). The Maori wars the British Army in New Zealand 1840-1872 .

Mair, Gilbert (1926). The Story of Gate Pa, April 29th 1864 [Reprinted by the Bay of Plenty Times Ltd in 1937 & 1964. Reprinted by Cadsonbury Publications in 2010. Reprinted by Tauranga Charitable Trust in 2014].

Matheson, Alister (2012). Te Mete Raukawa.

New Zealand Herald (7 May 1864, p. 3).

New Zealander (7 May 1864, p.5, column 4).

New Zealander (31 May 1864, p. 5, column 3).

Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui and Trustees of the Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui Settlement Trust and The Crown (2012). Deed of Settlement of Historical Claims (p. 15).

Ngātai, Hōri (1903). A Maori Survivor's Story: How the Ngaiterangi repulsed the Pakeha at the Battle of Gate Pa & Star (31 October 1903, p. 2).

Nicholas, Patrick (1999). The Treaty of Te Papa (Tauranga 1864).

Palmer, Jeni (n. d.). Bay of Plenty Deaths 1872-1920 E-G.

Palmer, Jeni (n. d.). Bay of Plenty Deaths 1872-1920 P-S.

Palmer, Jeni (n. d.). Bay of Plenty Deaths 1872-1920 T-Z.

Papers Past.

Prickett, Nigel (2004). Maori Casulties at Pukehinahina (Gate Pa), 29 April 1864.

Rice, H. E. (26 July 1864). 3425.01.24. Copy of a Despatch from Governor Sir George Grey K.C.B., to the Right Honourable Edward Cardwell, M.P. Government House, Auckland (pp. 86-89). British Parliamentary Papers. Colonies: New Zealand (GBPP). (The University of Waikato - Te Whare Wananga o Waikato).  

Smith, Thomas (3 May 1864) (Civil Commissioner, Tauranga). 3386.01.15. Copy of a Despatch from Governor Sir George Grey, K.C.B., to His Grace the Duke of Newcastle, K.G. Government House, Auckland. (pp. 63-64). British Parliamentary Papers. Colonies: New Zealand (GBPP). (The University of Waikato - Te Whare Wananga o Waikato).

Stafford, Donald Murray (1967). Te Arawa: A History of the Arawa People (p. 390).

Star (31 October 1903, p. 2). Another version of the account from Hōri Ngātai,

Taranaki Herald (14 May 1864, p. 3). The Attack on the Gate Pa.

Tauranga Minute books (Maori Land Court).

Waitangi Tribunal (2004). Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana: Report on the Tauranga confiscation claims. Wellington, New Zealand: Legislation Direct.

 

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Battle of Gate Pā: Māori


Year:1864